Category Archives: Wild Bird Company Blog

Seeds for Attracting Wild Birds by Steve Frye, Wild Bird Company

Happy Holidays!

I just wanted to take a moment and wish you all happy holidays. Thank you very much for your support of the Wild Bird Company over the past year (and beyond). A special thanks goes out to my family and friends for the support and to Wendy for all that she does for the store and customers. Wishing you all a very bird-filled New Year. May you always find the wonder and the joy of being outdoors.
–Steve
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Seeds for Attracting Wild Birds

Seeds for Attracting Wild Birds – Wild Bird Company Newsletter 12.12.17

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Many of the bird feeder complaints I hear, seed waste, rodents, sprouting, and filling the feeder too often, could be fixed by proper seed choice. If you make the right seed choices it will bring in more birds and possibly cost less to feed them. The following are quick rules and tips about bird seed to help optimize your bird feeding and minimize your frustration.

Sunflower Seed

Sunflower seed is the most attractive bird seed. Whatever you put out, sunflower should be the main component of your feeding system. All other seeds are just fine tuning. Sunflowers are a great source of fat and protein.

Black Oil Sunflower. Attracts a great variety of birds. Can be fed in tube, hopper, or platform feeders. The shell waste generated should be cleaned up periodically for the health of the birds.

Shelled or Hulled Sunflower. Will attract the greatest variety of birds compared to any other seed. It is also the cleanest bird seed. No shells, no sprouting. Hulled sunflower can also be fed in tube, hopper, and platform feeders. It generally costs about twice as much as oil sunflower, but the cleanliness is worth it to many customers. Use the medium chipped ones because they are more attractive to the birds and less expensive compared to the whole seeds (hearts) and the fine chips often turn into cement in your feeder.

Striped Sunflower. More expensive and less attractive than Oil Sunflower. Some larger species will eat them readily. Often put in mixes for its visual appeal to humans. Good on hopper and platform feeders, but I would avoid putting it in a tube feeder because it may clog the ports and many smaller species will pitch it aside getting to more desirable seeds.

Millet

Millet is attractive to ground feeding birds like sparrows and juncos. It should be presented on a platform or a hopper with a wide tray area, or on the ground itself. Millet is a carbohydrate and has a much longer shelf life compared to seeds containing fats which may turn rancid. Several millet varieties of various colors are found in seed mixes, but don’t confuse them with milo (sorghum) which is a larger round dark orange seed. If you feed millet in a tube feeder, the birds will either ignore it or toss it aside getting to the sunflowers. Not readily eaten by squirrels.

White Proso Millet. This is the most attractive variety of millet.

Red Proso Millet. Similar to white proso, but not quite as attractive.

Other Millets. Many varieties on the market. Some are referred to as German Millets. They come in an array of colors and none are as attractive as white proso.

Nyjer

Sometimes referred erroneously to as thistle, nyjer is a seed from a plant in the marigold family and it will not grow to maturity in North America. Therefore, all nyjer is imported from countries like Ethiopia, India, and Burma. It is steam processed before entering the country which usually makes it unable to germinate, but the processing is designed to kill other weed seeds that might enter in nyjer shipments. Nyjer is a very small black seed which is attractive to goldfinches, redpolls, and pine siskins. Some other species will eat it, but it is not a general purpose seed. It should be fed in a feeder designed for nyjer seed. Nyjer has a shell like a sunflower and it is very hard to tell if whole seeds or just the shells are lying below your feeder. Nyjer seed is prone to going stale, desiccating, or going rancid so you should never buy more than you can use in a few months’ time so that it stays fresh. A large portion of the nyjer sold in this country is already spoiled when customers buy it. Not a squirrel favorite.

Nuts

Nuts are high in fat and protein and they are a preferred “seed” for many species.

In-shell nuts are convenient for birds that cache food like members of the crow family (jays, magpies, crows, nutcrackers). Shelled nuts are taken by those birds and many others like chickadees, nuthatches, and woodpeckers. Some specialty nut feeders are on the market, but the most common way to feed them is on a platform.

In-shell Peanuts. A favorite for the crow family members. Both squirrels and birds tend to hide/bury these peanuts for later use.

Shelled Peanuts. These peanuts can be fed in a feeder similar to a suet feeder with smaller mesh. Birds that like shelled peanuts include chickadees, nuthatches, woodpeckers, some wrens, jays, magpies, nutcrackers, and crows.

Tree Nuts. These nuts are sold as individual nuts or more often some blend of almonds, cashews, walnuts, filberts, and pistachios etc. They often come to the bird seed market because they were rejected for human consumption. They are readily consumed by the same birds that like shelled peanuts.

Safflower

Safflower works best in a tube feeder with no other seeds mixed in. It is a seed used to fix either your squirrel problems or your grackle problems – it is not a great all-purpose food. If you are overrun by grackles and/or squirrels and cannot or are unwilling to prevent those critters from getting to your feeder, then safflower might be your answer. Both squirrels and grackles are not fond of safflower, but they will eat it. Safflower is an acquired taste for the birds, but no birds prefer safflower. I would avoid using mixes which contain safflower in hopper and tube feeders because it will tend to be tossed out by the birds trying to find better seeds.

Corn

Most songbirds do not like corn, but other larger species will come to it readily. Corn is for ground feeders and will work best fed on a platform. I would avoid using it in tube and hopper feeders. Mixes high in corn should only be used on a platform.

Shelled or Kernel Corn. A good and inexpensive food for attracting jays, ducks, geese, pheasants, and turkeys. Squirrels usually eat the germ and leave the rest of the kernel.

Ear Corn. Similar to shelled corn.

Cracked Corn. Has a broader appeal than kernel corn. Attracting sparrows, juncos, towhees, doves, and quail. Not a squirrel favorite.

Filler Seeds

Most bird seed mixes on the market contain filler seeds which make them inexpensive. However, these fillers get tossed aside by the birds and are eaten by rodents (other than squirrels), germinate, or go rotten. These seeds are the source of many bird feeder complaints.

Milo (Sorghum). The most common filler seed. Milo has been selectively grown over the decades specifically to make it not attractive to birds. It is used in cattle feed and the farmers did not want their crop eaten by the birds before they could harvest. Milo is a round seed, a bit larger than millet, and is a dark orange color. Some species in the southwest will eat it, but it is not preferred. I would avoid anything with milo in it. I sometimes see mixes in other stores which are mostly milo.s

Wheat Berries. These oval seeds are usually not in great quantities in bird seed mixes, but I would still avoid them because the birds just don’t eat them.

Steve’s Bird Seed Pet Peeves

Putting mixes in tube feeders. Mixed seeds usually consist of sunflower seeds combined with millet and other seeds. Tube feeders work best with sunflower seeds only; all other seeds get pitched out by the birds. Just because your feeders empty out quickly, doesn’t mean the birds are eating the seeds.

Finch Mixes. These mixes, marketed for finches, usually consist of nyjer, fine hulled sunflower, and lots of various millets. They are not bad mixes; it’s just that no self-respecting finch would ever eat millet which is usually the majority of the mix. They are great for ground feeders and I would be happy if they were marketed as junco or towhee mixes. Not quite as sexy, I suppose.

Vitamins Added. Seed manufacturers sometimes boast that vitamins have been added to wild bird seed mixes. While this may be required for caged birds, it is not needed for wild birds that eat your bird seeds only as a supplement to their wild diet. It is an unnecessary and expensive additive to appeal to your paternal instincts.

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Local Christmas Bird Counts

As we draw near to Christmas, all birders know it’s time for annual Christmas Bird Counts sponsored by the National Audubon Society. These counts go on all over the nation (and internationally too) in the weeks surrounding Christmas. Check the links below to learn more about Christmas Bird Counts and to find contact information on how to participate. You need not be an expert bird watcher to join in and it’s a great way to learn more. You can also participate in the count by recording your feeder birds if you don’t want to be in the field.

Colorado CBC List:

Colorado Birds, Christmas Bird Count dates updated

Audubon, Join the Christmas Bird Count

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Ask Steve

Q: Is there such a thing as a squirrel-proof feeder? I have bought many in the past and they all seem to fall short of being squirrel-proof.

A: Not all squirrel-proof feeders are created equal. We have gotten rid of many from our inventory over the years because they have fallen short, as you say. However, I find the most common issue when a customer complains about their squirrel-proof feeder not working well, is spacing. Squirrel-proof feeders need a bit of space all around them to work. If you hang a caged or weight restrictive feeder from a shepard’s crook pole, for example, the feeder will be too close to the pole. The squirrel can easily climb the pole and reach over to the feeder either shaking the seeds out or feeding without tripping the mechanism. You need to place the feeder so the squirrel has to climb down onto the feeder, then it will work fine.

If you are having squirrel problems with your shepard’s crook pole, rather than buying a squirrel-proof feeder which will not perform well, you should squirrel-proof the pole with a baffle and place your pole far enough away so the squirrels cannot jump to the pole over the baffle. Problem solved.

Q: What should I feed my robins?

A: First, let me say that your robins are fine. Many people worry because they feel robins should not be here in the winter, but robins are regular winter residents here and in many places with much harsher weather than ours. Now, to answer the question; it’s fun to have robins visit in any season. In winter, I think they respond best to raisins soaking in water in a shallow dish so they are all plump. Even after the raisins have been eaten, the robins will enjoy drinking the raisin water.

Purple Finches and American Goldfinch ©Steve Frye
Purple Finches and American Goldfinch by Steve Frye

European Goldfinch − Carduelis carduelis. Wild Bird Company Bird Walk, Bird of the Day 12.02.17

European Goldfinch − Carduelis carduelis

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Bird of the Day. Wild Bird Company Saturday Morning Bird Walk at Boulder Creek–75th St. and Twin Lakes (Boulder County), Boulder, US-CO, December 2, 2017. We Are Wild About Birds!

December 2, 2017 Bird Walk Count and Newsletter

Photo Gallery: December 2, 2017 Bird Walk

Slide Show: December 2, 2017
(Note: For some mobile devices, you may need to enable Javascript and download Flash Player. If your mobile device does not support Flash Player, please view the Photo Gallery.)

December 2, 2017. Sunny and calm. 45°F. 0-2 mph. 14 participants.
We had a delightful morning, the wind was calm and the temperature was just right. On warm winter days it seems that the birds are all relaxing and hiding. On cold winter days, the birds may be active, but if you are miserable you still don’t see much. That is why I love crisp winter birding – good bird activity and the observers are all relatively comfortable!

Bird of the Day – European Goldfinch − Carduelis carduelis – Boulder, CO
This morning we were watching birds in a weedy patch when Caroyln Beach said ‘what’s that bird with the red face’? The bird was clearly ‘goldfinchy’, but certainly not an American Goldfinch. I first thought of Lawrence’s Goldfinch from the west coast, but they don’t have any red on them. Turns out this bird was a European Goldfinch! I had never seen one before. With further research, we discovered that sightings of European Goldfinches in North America are assumed to be released/escaped caged birds. There are some wild populations in the upper Midwest established from released birds. Part of me likes to think that maybe this bird is from across the pond and we saw a true wild bird, not an escapee. After all, a brown booby showed up in Boulder County this year, why not a European Goldfinch?

European Goldfinch ©Jane Baryames
European Goldfinch by Jane Baryames

North Carolina Birding Portal – Local North Carolina Bird Watching, Bird Feeding and Birding Resources

North Carolina Birding Portal

Northern Cardinal – Cardinalis cardinalis − North Carolina State Bird
(click to Northern Cardinal reference page by Cornell Lab of Ornithology, All About Birds)

“Northern

Northern Cardinal – Cardinalis cardinalis − North Carolina State Bird − Birding in North Carolina

Wild Bird Company is your friendly resource for North Carolina birding, backyard bird watching and bird feeding since 1989. We welcome you to our North Carolina portal for bird watching and backyard birding resources. We are always available to answer questions about North Carolina wild birds and birds across the US − and to learn about your birding experiences.

Shop Our Wild Bird Company Online Store to Enhance Your North Carolina Birding

Identify Your North Carolina Wild Birds

Northern Cardinal - Cardinalis cardinalis

Northern Cardinal – Cardinalis cardinalis

Need help identifying the birds in your yard, your region or beyond? Visit “All About Birds” from Cornell Lab of Ornithology to help you in your search for North Carolina wild bird identification, habitat, audio, video and similar species − and for information focused on birds worldwide.

All About Birds, Online Bird Guide (Cornell Lab of Ornothology)

North Carolina Wild Bird Watching Resources

Audubon North Carolina
Nature Conservancy − North Carolina
North Carolina Bird Sightings − Powered by eBird
North Carolina Birding Hotspots Near You by BirdWatchingDaily.com
North Carolina State Parks
Sierra Club − North Carolina
US National Park Service − North Carolina
US National Wildlife Refuges − North Carolina

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Wild Bird Company − Missouri Birding Portal − “We’re Wild About Birds!”

Turn Your Backyard into an Entertaining Wild Bird Watching & Feeding Sanctuary . . . . for North Carolina Wild Birds.

Expert birding advice for North Carolina birding, bird watching, feeding, and attracting various species of wild birds to your backyard.

1.844.442.1322 (toll free) or 303.442.1322

info@wildbirdco.com

Missouri Birding Portal – Local Missouri Bird Watching, Bird Feeding and Birding Resources

Missouri Birding Portal

Eastern Bluebird – Sialia sialis − Missouri State Bird
(click to Eastern Bluebird reference page by Cornell Lab of Ornithology, All About Birds)

“Eastern

Eastern Bluebird – Sialia sialis − Missouri State Bird − Birding in Missouri

Wild Bird Company is your friendly resource for Missouri birding, backyard bird watching and bird feeding since 1989. We welcome you to our Missouri portal for bird watching and backyard birding resources. We are always available to answer questions about Missouri wild birds and birds across the US − and to learn about your birding experiences.

Shop Our Wild Bird Company Online Store to Enhance Your Missouri Birding

Identify Your Missouri Wild Birds

Eastern Bluebird - Sialia sialis

Eastern Bluebird – Sialia sialis

Need help identifying the birds in your yard, your region or beyond? Visit “All About Birds” from Cornell Lab of Ornithology to help you in your search for Missouri wild bird identification, habitat, audio, video and similar species − and for information focused on birds worldwide.

All About Birds, Online Bird Guide (Cornell Lab of Ornothology)

Missouri Wild Bird Watching Resources

Audubon Missouri
Missouri Bird Sightings − Powered by eBird
Missouri Birding Hotspots Near You by BirdWatchingDaily.com
Missouri State Parks
Nature Conservancy − Missouri
Sierra Club − Missouri
US National Park Service − Missouri
US National Wildlife Refuges − Missouri

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Wild Bird Company − Missouri Birding Portal − “We’re Wild About Birds!”

Turn Your Backyard into an Entertaining Wild Bird Watching & Feeding Sanctuary . . . . for Missouri Wild Birds.

Expert birding advice for Missouri birding, bird watching, feeding, and attracting various species of wild birds to your backyard.

1.844.442.1322 (toll free) or 303.442.1322

info@wildbirdco.com

Ohio Birding Portal – Local Ohio Bird Watching, Bird Feeding and Birding Resources

Ohio Birding Portal

Northern Cardinal – Cardinalis cardinalis − Ohio State Bird
(click to Northern Cardinal reference page by Cornell Lab of Ornithology, All About Birds)

“Northern

Northern Cardinal – Cardinalis cardinalis − Ohio State Bird − Birding in Ohio

Wild Bird Company is your friendly resource for Ohio birding, backyard bird watching and bird feeding since 1989. We welcome you to our Ohio portal for bird watching and backyard birding resources. We are always available to answer questions about Ohio wild birds and birds across the US − and to learn about your birding experiences.

Shop Our Wild Bird Company Online Store to Enhance Your Ohio Birding

Identify Your Ohio Wild Birds

Northern Cardinal - Cardinalis cardinalis

Northern Cardinal – Cardinalis cardinalis

Need help identifying the birds in your yard, your region or beyond? Visit “All About Birds” from Cornell Lab of Ornithology to help you in your search for Ohio wild bird identification, habitat, audio, video and similar species − and for information focused on birds worldwide.

All About Birds, Online Bird Guide (Cornell Lab of Ornothology)

Ohio Wild Bird Watching Resources

Audubon Ohio
Nature Conservancy − Ohio
Ohio Bird Sightings − Powered by eBird
Ohio Birding Hotspots Near You by BirdWatchingDaily.com
Ohio State Parks
Sierra Club − Ohio
US National Park Service − Ohio
US National Wildlife Refuges − Ohio

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Wild Bird Company − Ohio Birding Portal − “We’re Wild About Birds!”

Turn Your Backyard into an Entertaining Wild Bird Watching & Feeding Sanctuary . . . . for Ohio Wild Birds.

Expert birding advice for Ohio birding, bird watching, feeding, and attracting various species of wild birds to your backyard.

1.844.442.1322 (toll free) or 303.442.1322

info@wildbirdco.com

Washington Birding Portal – Local Washington Bird Watching, Bird Feeding and Birding Resources

Washington Birding Portal

American Goldfinch − Spinus tristis − Washington State Bird
(click to American Goldfinch reference page by Cornell Lab of Ornithology, All About Birds)

“American

American Goldfinch − Spinus tristis − Washington State Bird − Birding in Washington

Wild Bird Company is your friendly resource for Washington birding, backyard bird watching and bird feeding since 1989. We welcome you to our Washington portal for bird watching and backyard birding resources. We are always available to answer questions about Washington wild birds and birds across the US − and to learn about your birding experiences.

Shop Our Wild Bird Company Online Store to Enhance Your Washington Birding

Identify Your Washington Wild Birds

American Goldfinch − Spinus tristisAmerican Goldfinch − Spinus tristis

Need help identifying the birds in your yard, your region or beyond? Visit “All About Birds” from Cornell Lab of Ornithology to help you in your search for Washington wild bird identification, habitat, audio, video and similar species − and for information focused on birds worldwide.

All About Birds, Online Bird Guide (Cornell Lab of Ornothology)

Washington Wild Bird Watching Resources

Audubon Washington
Nature Conservancy − Washington
Sierra Club − Washington
US National Park Service − Washington
US National Wildlife Refuges − Washington
Washington Bird Sightings − Powered by eBird
Washington Birding Hotspots Near You by BirdWatchingDaily.com
Washington State Parks

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Wild Bird Company − Washington Birding Portal − “We’re Wild About Birds!”

Turn Your Backyard into an Entertaining Wild Bird Watching & Feeding Sanctuary . . . . for Washington Wild Birds.

Expert birding advice for Washington birding, bird watching, feeding, and attracting various species of wild birds to your backyard.

1.844.442.1322 (toll free) or 303.442.1322

info@wildbirdco.com

Massachusetts Birding Portal – Local Massachusetts Bird Watching, Bird Feeding and Birding Resources

Massachusetts Birding Portal

Black-Capped Chickadee – Poecile atricapillus − Massachusetts State Bird
(click to Black-Capped Chickadee reference page by Cornell Lab of Ornithology, All About Birds)

“Black-Capped

Black-Capped Chickadee – Poecile atricapillus − Massachusetts State Bird − Birding in Massachusetts

Wild Bird Company is your friendly resource for Massachusetts birding, backyard bird watching and bird feeding since 1989. We welcome you to our Massachusetts portal for bird watching and backyard birding resources. We are always available to answer questions about Massachusetts wild birds and birds across the US − and to learn about your birding experiences.

Shop Our Wild Bird Company Online Store to Enhance Your Massachusetts Birding

Identify Your Massachusetts Wild Birds

Black-Capped Chickadee - Poecile atricapillusBlack-Capped Chickadee – Poecile atricapillus

Need help identifying the birds in your yard, your region or beyond? Visit “All About Birds” from Cornell Lab of Ornithology to help you in your search for Massachusetts wild bird identification, habitat, audio, video and similar species − and for information focused on birds worldwide.

All About Birds, Online Bird Guide (Cornell Lab of Ornothology)

Massachusetts Wild Bird Watching Resources

Audubon Massachusetts
Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge
Massachusetts Bird Sightings − Powered by eBird
Massachusetts Birding Hotspots Near You by BirdWatchingDaily.com
Massachusetts State Parks
Massasoit National Wildlife Refuge
Nantucket National Wildlife Refuge
Nature Conservancy − Massachusetts
Oxbow National Wildlife Refuge
Sierra Club − Massachusetts
US National Park Service – Massachusetts
US National Wildlife Refuges – Massachusetts

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Wild Bird Company − Massachusetts Birding Portal − “We’re Wild About Birds!”

Turn Your Backyard into an Entertaining Wild Bird Watching & Feeding Sanctuary . . . . for Massachusetts Wild Birds.

Expert birding advice for Massachusetts birding, bird watching, feeding, and attracting various species of wild birds to your backyard.

1.844.442.1322 (toll free) or 303.442.1322

Townsend’s Solitaire − Myadestes townsendi. Wild Bird Company Bird Walk, Bird of the Day 11.18.17

Townsend’s Solitaire − Myadestes townsendi

Bird of the Day. Wild Bird Company Saturday Morning Bird Walk at White Rocks Trail area, Boulder, US-CO, November 18, 2017. We Are Wild About Birds!

November 18, 2017 Bird Walk Count and Newsletter

Photo Gallery: November 18, 2017 Bird Walk

Slide Show: November 18, 2017
(Note: For some mobile devices, you may need to enable Javascript and download Flash Player. If your mobile device does not support Flash Player, please view the Photo Gallery.)

November 18, 2017. Sunny and pleasant. 6 participants.
I wasn’t in town for the walk this morning, but the Saturday Birders are undaunted. Reports are that the walk was a little slow bird-wise, but very nice just the same.

Bird of the Day – Townsend’s Solitaire − Myadestes townsendi – Boulder, CO
As a mostly random selection for Bird of the Day this week, I picked the Townsend’s Solitaire. They are a beautiful thrush that delights in the yard all winter long because it defends territories for food and sings when most others are silent. They are not a flashy bird, but have an elegance which is striking.

Townsend’s Solitaire ©Neal Zaun
Townsend's Solitaire by Neal Zaun

Northern Harrier − Circus cyaneus. Wild Bird Company Bird Walk, Bird of the Day 11.11.17

Northern Harrier − Circus cyaneus

Bird of the Day. Wild Bird Company Saturday Morning Bird Walk at Sombrero Marsh & Pond, Little Gaynor Lake, Jim Hamm Nature Area and Dodd Reservoir, Boulder, US-CO, November 11, 2017. We Are Wild About Birds!

November 11, 2017 Bird Walk Count and Newsletter

Photo Gallery: November 11, 2017 Bird Walk

Slide Show: November 11, 2017
(Note: For some mobile devices, you may need to enable Javascript and download Flash Player. If your mobile device does not support Flash Player, please view the Photo Gallery.)

November 11, 2017. Sunny and mild. 55°F. 2-6 mph. 12 participants.
In observance of Veteran’s Day, we ended up at Jim Hamm Nature Area where there is a dedication to Jim and other Vietnam Soldiers who were lost. Jim Hamm loved coming to this pond when he was young, just to sit and watch the wildlife. It’s a gem among our natural areas and great for birding.

Bird of the Day – Northern Harrier − Circus cyaneus – Boulder, CO
At Jim Hamm Nature Area we had a northern harrier working the corn field to the north. It was making passes low over the corn field and then going up and turning, then making another pass. Just like a crop duster. Harriers like to fly low and slow over meadows and fields listening for mice. When they hear one, they spin around and pounce!

Northern Harrier ©Kevin Rutherford
Northern Harrier by Kevin Rutherford

Ferruginous Hawk − Buteo regalis. Wild Bird Company Bird Walk, Bird of the Day 11.04.17

Ferruginous Hawk − Buteo regalis

Bird of the Day. Wild Bird Company Saturday Morning Bird Walk at Baseline Reservoir, Boulder Reservoir complex–Boulder Res, Lagerman Reservoir and Left Hand Creek at Nimbus Rd., Boulder, US-CO, November 4, 2017. We Are Wild About Birds!

November 4, 2017 Bird Walk Count and Newsletter

Photo Gallery: November 4, 2017 Bird Walk

Slide Show: November 4, 2017
(Note: For some mobile devices, you may need to enable Javascript and download Flash Player. If your mobile device does not support Flash Player, please view the Photo Gallery.)

November 4, 2017. Partly cloudy and breezy. 40-55°F. 5-25 mph. 14 participants.
The first Saturday in November is traditionally our ‘Look for Loons’ walk. We dipped on the loons, but we did have dramatic clouds and lighting. Our loon walk was seemingly hijacked by the raptors, which isn’t half bad.

Bird of the Day – Ferruginous Hawk − Buteo regalis – Boulder, CO
Lagerman Reservoir has proven, over the last couple of years, to be the best place in Boulder County to see Ferruginous Hawks. I was watching one in the field when three more came over the hill. They all flew around and dispersed within a few minutes, but it was the greatest number of ferruginous hawks I’ve seen in one place. Ferruginous hawks were once considered eagles and DNA evidence shows that they are closely related to eagles. A spectacular bird!

Ferruginous Hawk ©Kevin Rutherford
Ferruginous Hawk by Kevin Rutherford

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